Your external examination, both at mid-year and at the end of year National examination, will include TWO NCEA Assessments.
The first assessment will be on GENRE and will be our study of SCIENCE FICTION films, the CONVENTIONS of Science Fiction Genre and how the GENRE has changed since the 1950's.Please note that the essay is on the GENRE and NOT just about individual texts you have studied in class. The Science Fiction films we have studied in class and your OWN independent viewing of Science Fiction films are the specific text details that you will give to support your arguments about how the genre has changed. your second examination is on Representation; that is the representation of women and girls in music videos - remember the target audience for this is pre-teens or tweens and teenagers:

Here is the examination paper on Genre you will sit:





Here is the examination paper on Representation you will sit:




Here is an example of a really well completed Planning page for the Representation essay:




Here is a Powerpoint on the aspects that MUST be included in your essays:



HERE are the comments concerning student performance in last year's examination on the representation essay:


90278 Demonstrate understanding of messages and/or values, and representations within media texts
ACHIEVEMENT
Candidates who were awarded Achievement for this standard demonstrated the required skills and knowledge. They commonly:
identified and described a group in society who are represented in media texts
• described how the group is represented using at least one descriptor, e.g. rebellious or adventurous
• demonstrated an understanding of how this representation was constructed
• demonstrated how this representation reflected a social message/value
• provided at least two detailed examples of how the representations and/or messages/values were constructed in two different media texts
• demonstrated an understanding of the relationship between the representation and the message/value.

NOT ACHIEVED
Candidates who were assessed as Not Achieved for this standard lacked some or all of the skills and knowledge required for the award of Achievement. They commonly:
did not identify or qualify within the script an actual group which exists in society (i.e. nerds or good kiwi bloke is the constructed representation not the actual group)
• did not differentiate between the representation and the message/value
• did not discuss either representations or messages/values
• did not give two specific or detailed examples for two different media texts to support their statements
• provided a discussion on genre and/or audience rather than representations and messages/values
• did not link the message/value to the representation discussed.

ACHIEVEMENT WITH MERIT
In addition to the skills and knowledge required for the award of Achievement, candidates who were awarded Achievement with Merit commonly:
provided extensive detail to support their statements, with some explanation of why these representations and messages/values are constructed in media texts
• provided a detailed explanation as to why the representation and message/value was created
• demonstrated an understanding of the constructed nature of representations
• compared different representations/messages/values of the same group and gave reasons for the difference.

ACHIEVEMENT WITH EXCELLENCE
In addition to the skills and knowledge required for the award of Achievement with Merit, candidates who were awarded Achievement with Excellence commonly:
identified the effect of the representations and values on the group and/or the target audience and/or wider society
• used valid observations to support their assertions including statistics, communication theories, research, quotes or other media theories
• demonstrated an understanding of the effect of changing values in society on the construction of representations in media texts.

OTHER COMMENTS
Many candidates who based their discussion on the representation of real people in the media such as celebrities, politicians, and/or used news and/or documentary, did not demonstrate an understanding of the constructed nature of representations and the messages/values that resulted from or are inherent in these constructions. Candidates who used opinion or conjecture as the basis for discussing the implications of representations/messages/values, did not present the analysis required for Achievement with Excellence.

HERE are the comments concerning student performance in last year's examination on the genre essay:


90279 Demonstrate understanding of a media genre
ACHIEVEMENT
Candidates who were awarded Achievement for this standard demonstrated the required skills and knowledge. They commonly:
identified and described one significant code or convention from a genre using specific and relevant supporting examples from at least two texts associated with the genre
• described how a code or convention was a significant feature of their chosen genre, with
supporting examples from two texts or more
• used texts that were representative of their chosen genre
• described a significant development with supporting evidence by comparing at least two media texts from the same genre
• avoided generalisations in describing a code or a convention in Question One and a significant development in Question Two
• linked the code or convention in Question One and development in Question Two back to the genre for each text they discussed
• outlined the nature and origin of the development in Question Two with an example from a text, before moving into discussion of the development.

NOT ACHIEVED
Candidates who were assessed as Not Achieved for this standard lacked some or all of the skills and knowledge required for the award of Achievement. They commonly:
gave incomplete responses, or did not complete both questions
• wrote only about the media texts without any link to the code or convention or development in the genre
• referred to only one media text
• covered too many codes or conventions and developments without providing enough detail and examples on any one
• used generic film language codes/conventions common to most genres in Question One, e.g. character, dialogue, lighting, music, editing, props, colour, camera angles, and special effects, without demonstrating their uniqueness or relevance to the chosen genre
• made sweeping generalisations, or assertions (e.g. “society had changed…”), without any supporting detail from media texts
• wrote too much irrelevant material
• did not describe a significant or relevant development in Question Two
• made simplistic comparisons in Question Two between two texts of the same genre from quite different cultural backgrounds, e.g. Nosferatu and Twilight, without describing how these changes occurred.

ACHIEVEMENT WITH MERIT
In addition to the skills and knowledge required for the award of Achievement, candidates who were awarded Achievement with Merit commonly:
explained with detailed and relevant reasons why their codes/conventions in Question One were a significant feature of their genre
• explained with detailed and relevant reasons why their development in Question Two was significant to their genre
• demonstrated the effects of the development on the chosen genre and / or the audience by making comparisons between at least two media texts
• made connections between the genre, code/convention and the audience
• referred to more than two media texts in support of their ideas in Question One and Two
• developed a clear argument beginning with a general overview of how the code or convention was used (in at least two media texts), and progressing to why it was significant to the selected genre and / or the audience.

ACHIEVEMENT WITH EXCELLENCE
In addition to the skills and knowledge required for the award of Achievement with Merit, candidates who were awarded Achievement with Excellence commonly:
used a wide range of well chosen texts to support their ideas in response to a significant code/convention and development associated with their selected genre
• wrote a cohesive essay that integrated the implications associated with a code/convention (in Question One) and development in the genre (in Question Two) throughout the essay
• convincingly discussed/analysed in Question Two the effects of factors such as commercial and economic considerations, historical, cultural, sociological, technological or audience tastes, and how and why these influenced the development of their chosen genre, with valid observations
• discussed/analysed the implications of a code/convention in Question One, e.g. how and why they defined or limited a genre, or the cultural or social influence of a particular code or convention, with valid observations
• demonstrated a thorough understanding of the genre, and of the impact, significance and effects of a code/convention and development on the media genre and / or audience.

OTHER COMMENTS
Many candidates used universal codes or conventions, (such as costume, characterisation, music, camera angles, lighting, conflict, violence, colour, special effects, narrative structure, technology) without defining how they were unique to their chosen genre. For example, some responses to special effects used simplistic comparisons – “in the 1950s special effects were very basic, but by 2008 they have become very high tech….” without making a connection to the genre. Similarly some candidates who chose the genre of advertising did not discuss a relevant development in the genre for Question Two. Most candidates chose horror, with either slasher or vampire sub-genres. Most of these responses focused on violence, low-key lighting, isolated setting and final girl dominate. Candidates who tightly defined a narrowed-down genre, also effectively demonstrated understanding of their genre. Examples of genres that were narrowed down are Hollywood musicals, sitcoms, westerns, a sub-genre of horror, dystopian science fiction rather than science fiction, psychological thriller rather than thriller.
Regardless of the genre, most candidates dealt with two developments in Question Two: the role of women/changing representation of women, and the Hayes Code. In many cases there were simplistic answers, and most candidates who used the Hayes Code were not awarded more than Achievement. Increased violence and sexual content is seen in most genres, and many candidates did not convincingly explain how such developments were significant for a particular genre. Candidates were disadvantaged when they focused on developments that occurred within society but did not link the development to their genre. Many used changing audience tastes or increasing audience sophistication or desensitization, but did not give reasons why this occurred. Some answers oversimplified developments by contrasting an early example of the genre with a contemporary one, making only the point that modern audiences would be bored by the early text, or modern texts would be too complex or unacceptable to early audiences. Some candidates gave incorrect responses, such as the bathroom as a setting in thrillers, or the use of Forgotten Silver as an example of a documentary text (it is actually a mockumentary); or referred to a range of disparate advertisements, which does not constitute a genre.

2009 EXAMINATION QUESTIONS AND EXEMPLARS :Representation:




Genre:


Here is the link to the nzqa exemplars for achieved, merit and excellence for the Genre essay 2009:





Here is an example of a sci-fi genre essay: